Category Archives: Uncategorized

David Bruce: KING EDWARD III: A Retelling — Act 2, Scenes 1-2

— 2.1 — Lodowick, King Edward III’s secretary, said this to himself about the King’s falling in love with the Countess of Salisbury: “I might perceive his eye in her eye to be lost, his ear to drink her sweet … Continue reading

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David Bruce: Ben Jonson’s THE DEVIL IS AN ASS: A Retelling — Act 4, Scenes 1-2

— 4.1 — In her home, Lady Tailbush andMerecraft talked about the project they were working on together. “A pox upon referring the project to commissioners!” Lady Tailbush said. “I’d rather hear that it were past the seals.” To get … Continue reading

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David Bruce: Ben Jonson’s THE DEVIL IS AN ASS: A Retelling — Act 3, Scenes 4-6

— 3.4 — Engine and Wittipol entered the room. Merecraft took Engine aside and asked, “How goes the cry?” The cry was a hunting cry. Merecraft was asking how the hunt for Dick Robinson was going. Engine replied, “Excellently well!” … Continue reading

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David Bruce: John Ford’s THE LOVER’S MELANCHOLY: A Retelling — Act 5, Scene 1

— 5.1 — Corax and Cleophila talked together in a room in the castle. “It is well, it is well,” Corax said. “The hour is at hand that must conclude the business — the business that no skill could all … Continue reading

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David Bruce: John Ford’s THE LOVER’S MELANCHOLY: A Retelling — Act 3, Scene 2

— 3.2 — Kala and Parthenophill talked together in a room in Thamasta’s house. Kala said, “My lady is expecting you — she thinks all time moves too slowly until you come to her. Therefore, young man, if you intend … Continue reading

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David Bruce: John Ford’s THE LOVER’S MELANCHOLY: A Retelling — Act 1, Scene 2

— 1.2 — Rhetias, a reduced-in-status courtier who was carelessly dressed, stood alone in another room in the palace. He was so reduced in status that foolish courtiers such as Pelias called him “sirrah,” a term that a man of … Continue reading

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David Bruce: THE FAMOUS VICTORIES OF HENRY V: A Retelling — Scenes 20-12

— Scene 20 — Derrick, standing on the battlefield with his belt full of shoes and boots, said to himself, “What now? By God’s wounds, it did me good to see how I triumphed over the Frenchmen.” John Cobbler arrived, … Continue reading

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