Category Archives: Philosophy

NOTES on H. P. Owen (1926-1996): The Doctrine of Analogy

Can what we say about God be literally true in the same sense as when applied to finite human experience? H. P. Owen gives an answer to this question in his The Christian Knowledge of God(copyright 1969). Owen argues in … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged | Leave a comment

NOTES on Paul Tillich (1886-1965): Religious Symbols

Paul Tillich is an important theologian who argued that if we are to talk about God, our language must be symbolic. He argues that symbols open up new levels of reality and of meaning. Tillich argues that symbols are an … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged | Leave a comment

NOTES on Religion, Verification, and Falsification

Antony Flew (1923-2010), R. M. Hare (1919-2002), and Basil Mitchell (1917-2011): The Falsification Debate Philosophers take language seriously because it is so useful in thinking. Accordingly, philosophers have studied the nature of religious language to find out whether it is … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

NOTES on A.J. Ayer (1910-1989) and Frederick Copleston (1907-1994): A Discussion on Religious Language

We will now address a difficult topic about language. Assuming that there is a God, we wish to talk about that God. The Judeo-Christian conception of God is that God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent. In addition, God created the … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged , | Leave a comment

NOTES on Paul Tillich (1886-1965): Faith as Ultimate Concern

Paul Tillich’s concept of faith as ultimate concern is fascinating. According to Tillich, “Faith is the state of being ultimately concerned: the dynamics of faith are the dynamics of man’s ultimate concern.” All of us have many concerns. Certainly we … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged | Leave a comment

NOTES on C. S. Lewis (1898-1963): On Obstinacy in Belief

In his essay “On Obstinacy in Belief,” C. S. Lewis argues that religious beliefs are not like scientific hypotheses. In particular, he is concerned with the nature of belief in God after that belief has been established and the believer … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged | Leave a comment

David Bruce (born 1954) — Agnostism: A Good Option?

I. William Kingdon Clifford (1845-1879) and T. H. Huxley (1825-1895): Agnosticism — The Only Legitimate Response Two people who believed that it is both illogical and immoral to believe in God are William Kingdon Clifford (1845-1879) and Thomas Henry Huxley … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment