David Bruce: John Webster’s THE WHITE DEVIL: A Retelling — Act 4, Scene 2

— 4.2 —

The Matron of the House of Convertitesand Flamineo spoke together.

The Matron said, “Should it be known that the Duke of Brachiano has such access to your imprisoned sister, Vittoria, I would be likely to incur much damage because of it.”

“Not a scruple,” Flamineo said. “Not even a tiny bit. The Pope lies on his deathbed, and the heads of those who could cause you trouble are troubled now with other business than the guarding of a lady.”

Francisco de Medici’s servant, carrying Francisco’s letter, entered the scene and said, “Flamineo is yonder in conferencewith the Matron.”

He walked over to them and said to the Matron, “Let me speak with you. I entreat you to deliver for methis letter to the fair Vittoria.”

“I shall, sir,” the Matron said.

Brachiano entered the scene.

Francisco de Medici’s servantsaid, “Deliver it with all care and secrecy. Hereafter you shall know me, and you shall receive thanks for this courtesy.”

Francisco de Medici’s servantexited.

Flamineo said, “What’s going on now? What’s that?”

“A letter,” the Matron answered.

“To my sister?” Flamineo said. “I’ll see that it is delivered.”

The Matron handed him the letter and then exited.

Flamineo looked at the letter.

Brachiano asked, “What’s that you are reading, Flamineo?”

“Look,” Flamineo said, handing him the letter.

Brachiano looked at it and said, “Ha!”

He read out loud, “To the most unfortunate, his best respected Vittoria.”

He then asked, “Who was the messenger who brought this letter?”

“I don’t know,” Flamineo answered.

“No!” Brachiano said. “Who sent it?”

Flamineo cursed, “By God’s foot! You speak as if a man should know what fowl is coffined in a baked meat-pie before you cut it up.”

Brachiano said, “I’ll open it, and I would open it even if it were her heart. What’s here subscribed! It’s signed by the Duke of Florence, Francisco de Medici! This deception is gross and palpable. I have found out who sent it here.”

He handed Flamineo the letter and said, “Read it, read it.”

Flamineo read out loud:

Your tears I’ll turn to triumphs, be but mine;

Your prop is fallen: I pity, that a vine

Which princes heretofore have longed to gather,

Wanting [Lacking] supporters, now should fade and wither.”

In the poem, Francisco de Medici was comparing Vittoria to a vine. The prop that had fallen and no longer supported her was Brachiano.

Flamineo commented to Brachiano, “Wine, indeed, my lord, with lees — dregs — would serve Francisco de Medici’s turn.”

He read out loud:

Your sad imprisonment I’ll soon uncharm,

And with a princely uncontrolled arm

Lead you to Florence, where my love and care

Shall hang your wishes in my silver hair.”

Flamineo commented, “A halter on his strange equivocation!”

Flamineo may have realized immediately that the letter was a trick by Francisco de Medici to make Brachiano jealous. If so, he also may have realized immediately that Francisco de Medici was not in love with Vittoria. That being the case, Francisco de Medici very likely would want Vittoria punished. The word “hang” would in that case mean hang by a noose, which this society called a halter.

Flamineo read out loud:

Nor for my years return me the sad willow;

Who would prefer blossoms before fruit that’s mellow?

Francisco de Medici was asking not to be rejected because of his silver hair and his age.

Willows were a symbol of unrequited love.

Mellow fruit is ripe fruit. Francisco de Medici believed that ripe, sweet, juicy fruit was preferable to blossoms.

Flamineo commented, “The fruit is rotten, on my knowledge, with lying too long in the bedstraw.”

Fruit was laid in straw while it ripened. Straw was also used in mattresses.

Flamineo read out loud:

And all the lines of age this line convinces;

The gods never wax [grow] old, no more do princes.”

The “lines of age” meant 1) wrinkles on his face, and 2) old maxims and proverbs.

Princes never grow old? If they don’t (of course, some do grow old), a cynic might say that it’s because they are assassinated before they grow old.

But the line can be interpreted as saying that princes never grow older than the gods, which is true because the gods are immortal.

Flamineo commented, “A pox on it! Tear the letter to pieces. Let’s have no more atheists, for God’s sake.”

He was saying that Francisco de Medici was an atheist because he had mentioned the ancient gods, plural, rather than the god of Christianity.

Brachiano cursed, “By God’s death! I’ll cut Vittoria into motes of dust, and let the irregular, disorderly north wind sweep her up and blow her into Francisco de Medici’s nostrils. Where’s this whore?”

“This whore” was Vittoria, Flamineo’s sister.

“What?” Flamineo said. “What do you call her?”

“Oh, I could be mad!” Brachiano said. “I could forestall the baldness caused by the cursed disease syphilis that she’ll bring me to and tear my own hair off. Where’s this changeable stuff?”

By “changeable stuff,” Brachiano meant “an inconstant whore,” but Flamineo punned on the phrase’s other meaning of “changeable material.” Some fabrics such as shot silk changed colors when viewed from different directions because the warp-threads were one color and the weft-threads were a different color. Watered silk was a fabric that had a rippled pattern resembling waves and a glossy finish.

Flamineo replied, “Over head and ears in water, I assure you. She is not for your wearing.”

One meaning of “over head and ears in water” was that Vittoria was “in deep trouble.” Another meaning may be that Vittoria was crying because she was imprisoned.

One meaning of “not for your wearing” is “not for you to have sex with.” The proverb “win her and wear her” meant “marry her and consummate the marriage.”

Brachiano said, “In, you pander!”

He meant: Go in and get Vittoria, you pander!

Flamineo said, “What, me, my lord? Am I your dog?”

Brachiano said, “A bloodhound.”

A bloodhound is a seeker after a fugitive.

Brachiano added, “Do you defy me? Do you resist me? Do you withstand me?”

Flamineo said, “’stand you! Let those who have diseases run; I need no plasters.”

Suppurating sores run.

Plasters are bandages.

Brachiano asked, “Do you want to be kicked?”

Flamineo asked, “Do you want to have your neck broken?”

This is how Flamineo had murdered Camillo, Vittoria’s husband. Someone who has murdered once is capable of murdering twice.

Flamineo continued, “I tell you, Duke Brachiano, I am not in Russia. My shins must be kept whole.”

Russians were reputed to hurt the shins of a person who had the money needed to pay off a debt but who refused to pay.

Brachiano asked, “Do you know who I am?”

“Oh, my lord, thoroughly!” Flamineo replied. “As in this world there are degrees of evils, so in this world there are degrees of devils. You’re a great duke, and I’m your poor secretary. I look now for a Spanish fig, or an Italian salad, daily.”

He meant that he looked to be poisoned soon. The poison could be put in a Spanish fig or an Italian salad.

Brachiano said, “Pander, ply your convoy, and leave your prating.”

“Pander, ply your convoy” meant “get on with your business as pandar.” The convoy was a person being escorted: Vittoria. Brachiano still wanted Flamineo to go in and get Vittoria.

Flamineo said, “All your kindness to me is like that miserable courtesy of Polyphemus to Ulysses; you reserve me to be devoured last.”

In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus (his Roman name is Ulysses) and some of his men visited the cave of Polyphemus the one-eyed Cyclops, who immediately ate two of Odysseus’ men. After Odysseus gave him some wine, Polyphemus gave Odysseus a guest-gift: He would eat Odysseus last.

Flamineo continued, “You would dig turfs out of my grave to feed your larks; that would be music to you.

“Come, I’ll lead you to her.”

Flamineo walked inside backwards, facing Brachiano, who followed him.

Brachiano said, “Do you face me?”

One meaning of “face” was “look threateningly at.”

Flamineo replied, “Oh, sir, I would not go before a politic — crafty and devious — enemy with my back towards him, even if there were a whirlpool behind me.”

Once Brachiano and Flamineo were inside, Vittoria came over to them.

Brachiano said to her, “Can you read, mistress? Look upon that letter.”

He handed her the letter and continued, “There are no strange characters, nor hieroglyphics. You need no commentary to understand it; I have grown to be your pimp and receive your love-letters.

“By God’s precious blood! You shall be a splendid great lady, a stately and advanced-in-society whore.”

Vittoria asked, “What are you saying, sir?”

Brachiano said, “Come, come, let’s see your cabinet, discover your treasury of love-letters. Death and Furies! I’ll see them all.”

Vittoria replied, “Sir, upon my soul, I haven’t any love-letters. From where was this letter sent?”

Brachiano said, “Confusion on your politic — faked — ignorance! You are reclaimed, are you? I’ll give you the bells, and let you fly to the devil.”

A reclaimed hawk was a tamed hawk. Reclaimed hawks had bells attached to their legs.

Brachiano was saying that Vittoria was untamed and evil, and he would just give her the bells and let her fly to the devil rather than seek to tame her.

Flamineo warned, “Beware of the hawk, my lord.”

Looking at the letter, Vittoria said, “The Duke of Florence! This is some treacherous plot, my lord. To me he never was lovely, I say, so much as in my sleep.”

The words were ambiguous. If she slept soundly, without dreaming, then she would not think of the Duke of Florence at all. But if she dreamed of him while she was sleeping, then his loveliness in real life never equaled or surpassed the loveliness he had in her dreams.

Brachiano said, “Right! There are plots. Your beauty! Oh, ten thousand curses on it! How long have I beheld the devil in crystal!”

“Beholding the devil in crystal” was a proverbial saying meaning “being deceived.” Think of fake fortune tellers looking at a ‘devil’ inside a crystal ball.

He continued, “Thou have led me, like a heathen sacrifice, with music, and with fatal yokes of flowers, to my eternal ruin. Woman to man is either a god, or a wolf.”

Vittoria began, “My lord —”

Brachiano said, “Go away! We’ll be as differing as two magnets — the one shall shun the other. What! Do thou weep?

“Procure but ten of thy dissembling trade, and you’d furnish all the Irish funerals with howling beyond-wild Irish.”

At the funerals of wealthy people in Ireland, professional Irish mourners were hired to loudly mourn.

Flamineo said, “Bah, my lord!”

Brachiano said about Vittoria’s hand, “That hand, that cursed hand, which I have wearied with doting kisses!”

Thinking of his late wife, Isabella, whose murder he had caused, he said, “Oh, my sweetest duchess, how lovely are thou now!”

He said to Vittoria, “Thy loose thoughts scatter like mercury.”

When a ball of mercury is pressed, it divides into smaller balls and scatters. Mercury is sometimes called quicksilver because it looks like silver and quickly moves.

Brachiano continued, “I was bewitched, for all the world speaks ill of thee.”

Vittoria said, “No matter. I’ll live in such a way now that I’ll make that world recant, and change her speeches.”

She then said, “You did name your duchess.”

Brachiano said, “Whose death may God pardon!”

Vittoria said, “Whose death may God revenge on thee, most godless duke!”

Flamineo said to himself, “Now for two whirlwinds going at each other.”

Vittoria said to Brachiano, “What have I gained by thee, but infamy? Thou have stained the spotless honor of my family, and thou have frightened noble society away from my family, who are like those who are sick with the palsy, and retain stinking foxes about them, and are always shunned by those of choicer nostrils.”

The stinking foxes were thought to be effective against the disease called palsy, but the treatment caused the person suffering from the palsy to stink like the foxes.

Vittoria continued, “What do you call this house? Is this your palace? Didn’t the judge call it a house of penitent whores? Who sent me to it? Who sent me to this incontinent college? Wasn’t it you? Isn’t this your high promotion in society for me? Go, go and brag about how many ladies you have ruined, like me.

“Fare you well, sir; let me hear no more of you! I had a limb corrupted with an ulcer, but I have cut it off; and now I’ll go weeping to heaven on crutches.”

The ulcerous leg was her relationship with Brachiano, but she was saying she had just ended that.

Mark 9:45 states, “And if thy foot offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter halt into life, than having two feet to be cast into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched” (King James Version).

She continued, “As for your gifts, I will return them all, and I wish that I could make you the full executor of all my sins. Oh, that I could toss myself into a grave as quickly! For all thou are worth, I’ll not shed one tear more — I’ll burst first.”

She threw herself upon a bed.

Brachiano said, “I have drunk from the Lethe River.”

The Lethe River is the river of forgetfulness.

He said, “Vittoria! My dearest happiness! Vittoria! What do you ail, my love? Why do you weep?”

Vittoria said, “Yes, I now weep poniards, do you see?”

Poniards are daggers.

Each teardrop stabbed, but did it stab Vittoria, Brachiano, or both?

Brachiano asked, “Are not those matchless eyes mine?”

Vittoria replied, “I had rather they were not matches.”

If they were not matched, she might be ugly. She preferred being ugly to being Brachiano’s.

Brachiano asked, “Is not this lip mine?”

Turning away from him, Vittoria replied, “Yes; thus I would rather bite it off, rather than give it to thee.”

Flamineo advised, “Turn to my lord, good sister.”

Vittoria replied, “Go away from here, you pander!”

“Pander!” Flamineo said. “Am I the author of your sin?”

“Yes,” Vittoria replied. “He’s a base thief who a thief lets in.”

Flamineo had let Brachiano into her life.

Flamineo said to Brachiano, “We’re blown up, my lord —”

It was as if a mine had exploded under them.

Brachiano asked Vittoria, “Will thou listen to me? Once to be jealous of thee is to express that I will love thee everlastingly and never more be jealous.”

Vittoria replied, “Oh, thou fool, whose greatness has by much overgrown thy intelligence! What dare thou do that I don’t dare to suffer, excepting to be always thy whore? As for my being thy whore, in the sea’s bottom sooner thou shall make a bonfire.”

Flamineo said, “Oh, no oaths, for God’s sake!”

Brachiano asked, “Will you listen to me?”

Vittoria said, “Never.”

Flamineo said, “What a damned abscess is a woman’s will! Can nothing break it?”

He said to Brachiano, “Bah, bah, my lord, women are caught as you take tortoises — she must be turned on her back.”

She would be in the missionary position.

Flamineo said to Vittoria, “Sister, by this hand I am on your side.”

He said to Brachiano, “Come, come, you have wronged her. What a strange credulous man you were, my lord, to think the Duke of Florence would love her! Will any mercer — dealer in fine fabrics — take another’s ware once it has been roughly handled and sullied?”

He said to Vittoria, “And yet, sister, how scurvily this recalcitrance and naughtiness become you! Young rabbits stand against the hunters not long, and women’s anger should, like their flight, procure a little sport: a full cry for a quarter of an hour, and then be put to the dead squat.”

A cry is 1) the shedding of tears, and 2) the sound made by hounds in the hunt.

A dead quat is the squatting position taken by an animal at bay or in hiding.

An animal at bay will either kill its attacker or attackers, or it will die. In the case of a young rabbit, it will almost certainly huddle in fright and then be killed.

In this society, “to die” meant to have an orgasm.

Brachiano asked, “Shall these eyes, which have for so long a time dwelt upon your face, be now put out?”

Flamineo said to his sister, “No cruel landlady in the world, who lends forth pennies to street-cleaners, and takes interest for the loans, would do it.”

He said to Brachiano, “Caress her, my lord, and kiss her. Don’t be like a ferret, to let go your hold with blowing.”

Ferrets were supposed to release whatever they had captured if you blew on their face.

Brachiano said, “Let us renew right hands.”

A man and a woman who held hands and made vows to each other would be betrothed. Often, the man would place a ring on the woman’s right hand, and during the marriage ceremony later the ring would be placed on the left hand. Apparently, Brachiano and Vittoria had previously held hands and made vows to each other.

Vittoria yelled, “Get out!”

Brachiano said, “Never shall rage, or the wine that makes one forget, make me commit such a fault.”

Flamineo said to him, “Now you are on the right track — follow it hard!”

Brachiano said to Vittoria, “As long as thou are at peace with me, I don’t care if all the rest of the world threaten me with violent cannon.”

Flamineo said to his sister, “Note his penitence. The best natures do commit the grossest faults, when they’re given over to jealousy, just as the best wine, dying, makes the strongest vinegar.

“I’ll tell you: The sea’s more rough and raging than calm rivers, but not so sweet, nor so wholesome.

“A quiet woman is a still water under a great bridge. A man may shoot her safely.”

At times, it is very difficult to sail under London Bridge. Doing so quickly is called shooting.

Another meaning of the verb “shoot” is “ejaculate into.”

Vittoria said, “Oh, you dissembling men!”

Flamineo replied, “We sucked that, sister, from women’s breasts, in our first infancy.”

He meant that men had imbibed dissembling with their mother’s milk when they were infants.

Vittoria said, “To add misery to misery!”

Brachiano said, “Sweetest!”

“Am I not low enough?” Vittoria said. “Aye, aye, your good heart gathers and grows bigger like a snowball rolls and becomes bigger, now that your affection’s cold.”

She was saying that he didn’t love her anymore, and so he was acting more in accordance with his good heart, which preferred to reject her. Despite his words, she still did not believe that he loved her.

Flamineo said to her, “By God’s foot, it shall melt into a heart again, or all the wine in Rome shall run down to the dregs for it.”

Vittoria said to Brachiano, “Your dog or hawk should be rewarded better than I have been. I’ll speak not one word more.”

The reward for a dog or a hawk after hunting was a part of the prey it killed.

Flamineo said to Brachiano, “Stop her mouth with a sweet kiss, my lord.”

Brachiano kissed Vittoria.

Flamineo said to his sister, “So, now the tide’s turned, the vessel’s come about. Brachiano is facing in the right direction again. He’s a sweet armful. Oh, we curl-haired men are always very kind to women! This is well.”

Brachiano said to Vittoria, “That you should chide like this!”

Flamineo said to Brachiano, “Oh, sir, little chimneys always cast the most smoke! I sweat for you. Couple together with as deep a silence as did the Grecians in their wooden horse.”

“Couple together” can mean 1) be together, or 2) have sex together. Since sex can be noisy, Flamineo probably was advising Brachiano to continue to tightly hug Vittoria. The sex can come later.

In Virgil’s Aeneid, the Greeks finally conquered Troy with a trick. They built a huge hollow horse, filled it with soldiers, and left it behind as they pretended to sail away. They also left behind a Greek, who pretended to have escaped from them in order to avoid capital punishment, to tell the Trojans that if the wooden horse were taken inside Troy, the city would never fall. The Trojans took the wooden horse inside Troy, and that night, after remaining very quiet for a long time, the Greek soldiers came out of the horse, went to the city gates, and opened them to let the Greek army inside the city.

Flamineo continued, “My lord, supply your promises with deeds. You know that painted food no hunger feeds.”

Painted still lifes of fruit feed no one.

Flamineo had done his job: He had reconciled his sister and Brachiano. Now — or soon — he wanted to be rewarded.

Referring to Flamineo as Rome, Brachiano said, “Wait, ungrateful Rome —”

Rome was sometimes ungrateful to the people who served it, so Brachiano might more accurately be compared to Rome. One example is Coriolanus, a hero whom the Romans exiled.

Flamineo said, “Rome! It deserves to be called Barbary, on account of the villainous way it treats us.”

Barbary was a land of barbarians.

Brachiano said, “Quiet! The same project that the Duke of Florence (whether because of love for Vittoria or as an attempt to fool us I don’t know) laid down for her escape, I will pursue.”

He was going to take Vittoria from the House of Convertites. In his letter, part of which had not been read out loud, the Duke of Florence had outlined an escape plan for Vittoria.

Flamineo said, “And there is no time fitter than this night, my lord. Because the Pope is dead, and all the cardinals have entered the conclave for electing a new Pope, the city is in a great confusion. We may clothe her in a page’s suit, arrange a series of post-horses, embark on a ship, and sail as quickly as we can for Padua.”

Brachiano said, “I’ll immediately steal away the Prince Giovanni, and make for Padua. You two with your old mother, and young Marcello who serves the Duke of Florence — if you can convince Marcello to join us — will follow me. I will advance — promote — you all; as for you, Vittoria, think of a duchess’ title.”

He would marry her.

Flamineo said, “Did you hear that, sister!”

He then said to Brachiano, “Wait, my lord; I’ll tell you a tale.

“The crocodile, which lives in the Nile River, has a worm that breeds in its teeth, which puts it to extreme anguish. A little bird, no bigger than a wren, is barber-surgeon — a dentist — to this crocodile. It flies into the crocodile’s jaw, picks out the worm, and brings immediate relief. The aquatic reptile, glad of ease, but ungrateful to her that gave the ease, so that the bird may not talk widely about the crocodile abroad because of non-payment for the service rendered, closes its jaws, intending to swallow the bird, and so put the bird to perpetual silence. But nature, loathing such ingratitude, has armed this bird with a quill or prick on the head, the top of which wounds the crocodile in the mouth, thereby forcing the crocodile to open its bloody prison, and away flies the pretty tooth-picker from her cruel patient.”

Brachiano said, “Your meaning is that I have not rewarded the service you have done for me.”

True, but Flamineo cunningly provided another plausible interpretation of the tale.

Flamineo replied, “No, my lord.”

He then said to Vittoria, “You, sister, are the crocodile. You are blemished in your reputation, my lord cures it; and though the comparison does not hold in every particular, yet observe, and remember, what good the bird with the prick in the head has done for you, and scorn ingratitude.”

He was saying that Brachiano was going to cure her bad reputation by marrying her, and therefore Vittoria ought to be grateful to him.

Flamineo then thought:

It may appear to some ridiculous

Thus to talk knave and madman, and sometimes

Come in with a dried [old] sentence [aphorism], stuffed with sage [wisdom]:

But this allows my varying of shapes;

Knaves do grow great by being great men’s apes.

Flamineo knew that many people would find his behavior ridiculous, but there was a reason for his behavior. By serving Brachiano, he was hoping to rise and grow great.

***

Copyright by Bruce D. Bruce; All Rights Reserved

***

Kobo

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/john-webster-s-the-white-devil-a-retelling

Smashwords

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1000808

 

SOME BOOKS BY DAVID BRUCE

(Lots of FREE PDFs)

RETELLINGS OF A CLASSIC WORK OF LITERATURE

Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/731768

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZEHJnB1_5RpznJDgrdO9Fzkz0R5nqF6n/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s The Arraignment, or Poetaster: A Retelling                                                                          

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1144681

https://anecdotesandmusic.wordpress.com/2022/05/02/david-bruce-ben-jonsons-the-arraignment-or-poetaster-a-retelling-free-pdf/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1S1nIEZ7fgHIyV4-ZDozfJ4FcVUlaC13_/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Bartholomew Fair: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/759774

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SIoalHNdD99q9jKmXO3kVvh8ydxB4to8/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s The Case is Altered: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1112743

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WHn6mnGPDbZlTus6A644w0TCg_QoNDE4/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Catiline’s Conspiracy: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1098400

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1uQOLh10ExHMrx9z-P-5qUxaHc2CQTD0x/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/953165

https://drive.google.com/file/d/17vGtkBruVyQ09aeFtVStum9NCixZtfN1/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Epicene: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1073045

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dsXMV0sZ26Y9gwFFeu_Kry1cNcz2te6c/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Every Man in His Humor: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1104946

https://drive.google.com/file/d/14-GEUj96Fxm_Oopp2YyICHPXskE8QLCp/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Every Man Out of His Humor: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1121591

Ben Jonson’s The Fountain of Self-Love, or Cynthia’s Revels: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1129496

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-fdVc1npRztXd35ghACIA5SMMo060w8b/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s The New Inn: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1081049

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13yJqpwBvx7Z-NI7SgwQkgsEDj7UOpy3q/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Sejanus’ Fall: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1138210

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1eC9wyTDHm8cU2DTzk7sXcP3BQeaYnHEe/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s The Staple of News: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1088627

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sRxzFLJWRGRzOUO_lSzscxvQcADrTgX4/view?usp=sharing

Ben Jonson’s Volpone, or the Fox: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/745087

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EagmTdd7dPmGac68TiEYyOVOQwza5moT/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s Complete Plays: Retellings

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/911460

Christopher Marlowe’s Dido, Queen of Carthage: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/871108

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1WqCOjMsMUZMxvrIkJZQXLSCT0ZiGaaeP/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus: Retellings of the 1604 A-Text and of the 1616 B-Text

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/824058

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1UubeU27eLLD5n-ldCChu6WpSU0op30dp/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/904128

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1dL1zOwOsQXTmBMuVvL7byFHSvm7A_XVS/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s The Massacre at Paris: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/880308

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wr0cECCJNB7Y5EB7a8ZTd0nD7ZfnY-6j/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s The Rich Jew of Malta: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/909794

https://drive.google.com/file/d/10QIuaaar9tavcxDtRcOfPnpkitZu3AEy/view?usp=sharing

Christopher Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Parts 1 and 2: Retellings

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/890081

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vlnL66UbtvRMOWAnwTpSq12tbosRNrCN/view?usp=sharing

Dante’s Divine Comedy: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/238180

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16MC3INNAzLtjT4TqGtUmxBKYmp6Lnc5k/view?usp=sharing

Dante’s Inferno: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/89244

Dante’s Purgatory: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/210951

Dante’s Paradise: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/238110

The Famous Victories of Henry V: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/781086

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yj-AAS0oRbapdSeAw33gg6k2il78N7Yu/view?usp=sharing

From the Iliad to the Odyssey: A Retelling in Prose of Quintus of Smyrna’s Posthomerica

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/287203

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hRMimR9VchgFI7q5nBKmE6udiotCzq7c/view?usp=sharing

George Peele’s The Arraignment of Paris: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/942964

George Peele’s The Battle of Alcazar: A Retelling 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1006013

George’s Peele’s David and Bathsheba, and the Tragedy of Absalom: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/993326

George’s Peele’s Edward I: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1061540

George Peele’s The Old Wives’ Tale: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/918341

George-A-Greene, The Pinner of Wakefield: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1108197

https://drive.google.com/file/d/18MYbD9wENgFqSMC_s-PijXsorVQguFWx/view?usp=sharing

The History of King Leir: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/800724

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MdkCVAtxuWZrgkCNMwrJ2uDLNDwjnFBk/view?usp=sharing

Homer’s Iliad: A Retelling in Prose

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/264676

https://drive.google.com/file/d/18tiAjtd5a6Qil0FHIss2UpCEacizaij3/view?usp=sharing

Homer’s Odyssey: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/87553

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rn5b3A6TFJngdZ_DC0daL9jZBToiSy-P/view?usp=sharing

Jason and the Argonauts: A Retelling in Prose of Apollonius of Rhodes’ Argonautica

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/337653  

https://drive.google.com/file/d/11fFWYrzu_YBK_Zb8aYQkYDvj5tDjSYPw/view?usp=sharing

The Jests of George Peele: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1064210

John Ford: Eight Plays Translated into Modern English

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/989979

John Ford’s The Broken Heart: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/792090

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PVkKm5BxBYE8uUY9IzcjdEQZ5ipGmxlm/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s The Fancies, Chaste and Noble: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/989291

https://drive.google.com/file/d/19JQQmLv_b3Oy3N3yhRpQM0b5ymAFh_zy/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s The Lady’s Trial: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/985699

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16F0PoPepXJJAX2RBn2lVK1Apvp6gwO9g/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s The Lover’s Melancholy: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/946285

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DTu7EkdqS8PEuljstF4KMnW9d3S5CiXc/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s Love’s Sacrifice: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/925020

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aE9jUQfe3e4acoJ63kIaqY57Mi9hrJja/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s Perkin Warbeck: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/937190

https://drive.google.com/file/d/14GOL5rPf6lcYb-e7ml9_BDzcFufbPjo1/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s The Queen: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/930049

https://drive.google.com/file/d/14GOL5rPf6lcYb-e7ml9_BDzcFufbPjo1/view?usp=sharing

John Ford’s ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/771031

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1V9aUtdKeYWY6DRoVimK-Vq6J8a6DL9JN/view?usp=sharing

John Webster’s The White Devil: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1000808

https://drive.google.com/file/d/19zCtHbfGVamswILTd8MUDWC1pabCUEs8/view?usp=sharing

King Edward III: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/814530

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_gqk9Es–Qvi8EjqY_4OztVsCiVJcQ0j/view?usp=sharing

The Merry Devil of Edmonton: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/957047

Robert Greene’s Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/915455

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1bX1a4cbdne38rgJ2sy4A4_8SIQ_ljnCW/view?usp=sharing

The Taming of a Shrew: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1052341

https://drive.google.com/file/d/10FsrQNk4Z1TAbiW_5VCD303VnEZqR6tP/view?usp=sharing

Tarlton’s Jests: A Retelling

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/772884

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QcGqnBsSPsRdPwctADo6DytHqZSyDMkG/view?usp=sharing

The Trojan War and Its Aftermath: Four Ancient Epic Poems

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/486330

Virgil’s Aeneid: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/277646

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yl8jYM0EJwB99WnoNlZRQEIms6UJIpFW/view?usp=sharing

William Shakespeare’s 5 Late Romances: Retellings in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/724666

William Shakespeare’s 10 Histories: Retellings in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/776868

William Shakespeare’s 11 Tragedies: Retellings in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/776890

William Shakespeare’s 12 Comedies: Retellings in Prose

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/715562

William Shakespeare’s 38 Plays: Retellings in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/777062

William Shakespeare’s 1 Henry IV, aka Henry IV, Part 1: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/396839

William Shakespeare’s 2 Henry IV, aka Henry IV, Part 2: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/502075

William Shakespeare’s 1 Henry VI, aka Henry VI, Part 1: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/675826

William Shakespeare’s 2 Henry VI, aka Henry VI, Part 2: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/687115

William Shakespeare’s 3 Henry VI, aka Henry VI, Part 3: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/694202

William Shakespeare’s All’s Well that Ends Well: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/660279

William Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/561440

William Shakespeare’s As You Like It: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/411180

William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/474177

William Shakespeare’s Coriolanus: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/651995

William Shakespeare’s Cymbeline: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/607757

William Shakespeare’s Hamlet: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/521558

William Shakespeare’s Henry V: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/494583

William Shakespeare’s Henry VIII: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/702433

William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/417297

William Shakespeare’s King John: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/667943

William Shakespeare’s King Lear: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/549148

William Shakespeare’s Love’s Labor’s Lost: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/640495

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/371976

William Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/530136

William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/485384

William Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/510046

William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/389517

William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/432053

William Shakespeare’s Othello: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/469501

William Shakespeare’s Pericles, Prince of Tyre: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/588726

William Shakespeare’s Richard II: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/633694

William Shakespeare’s Richard III: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/598141

William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/385811

William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/424622

William Shakespeare’s The Tempest: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/437521

William Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/626171

William Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/569421

William Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/617533

William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/404123

William Shakespeare’s The Two Gentlemen of Verona: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/575743

William Shakespeare’s The Two Noble Kinsmen: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/712849

William Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale: A Retelling in Prose 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/539561

OTHER FICTION

Candide’s Two Girlfriends (Adult)

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/247531

The Erotic Adventures of Candide (Adult)

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/249299

Honey Badger Goes to Hell — and Heaven

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/306009

I Want to Die — Or Fight Back

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/83479  

“School Legend: A Short Story”

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1123252

“Why I Support Same-Sex Civil Marriage”

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/34568

CHILDREN’S BIOGRAPHY

Nadia Comaneci: Perfect Ten

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/96982

PERSONAL FINANCE

How to Manage Your Money: A Guide for the Non-Rich

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/469305

ANECDOTE COLLECTIONS

250 Anecdotes About Opera

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/310277

250 Anecdotes About Religion

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/106782

250 Anecdotes About Religion: Volume 2

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/106861

250 Music Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/427367

Be a Work of Art: 250 Anecdotes and Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/105419

Boredom is Anti-Life: 250 Anecdotes and Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/156495

The Coolest People in Art: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/97814

The Coolest People in the Arts: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/159914

The Coolest People in Books: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/98030

The Coolest People in Comedy: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/98364

Create, Then Take a Break: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/254240

Don’t Fear the Reaper: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/98212

The Funniest People in Art: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/99002

The Funniest People in Books: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/99313

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/105652

The Funniest People in Books, Volume 3: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/105939

The Funniest People in Comedy: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/99159

The Funniest People in Dance: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/98588

The Funniest People in Families: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108542

The Funniest People in Families, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108809

The Funniest People in Families, Volume 3: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108821

The Funniest People in Families, Volume 4: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108830

The Funniest People in Families, Volume 5: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108841

The Funniest People in Families, Volume 6: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108857

The Funniest People in Movies: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/34647

The Funniest People in Music: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/100442

The Funniest People in Music, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/100473

The Funniest People in Music, Volume 3: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/100544

The Funniest People in Neighborhoods: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/106442

The Funniest People in Relationships: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108060

The Funniest People in Sports: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/107239

The Funniest People in Sports, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/107576

The Funniest People in Television and Radio: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/106234

The Funniest People in Theater: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/104257

The Funniest People Who Live Life: 250 Anecdotes 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/107847

The Funniest People Who Live Life, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes 

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108564

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds, Volume 1: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/34822

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/35011

Maximum Cool: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/97550

The Most Interesting People in Movies: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108582

The Most Interesting People in Politics and History: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108392

The Most Interesting People in Politics and History, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108398

The Most Interesting People in Politics and History, Volume 3: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108422

The Most Interesting People in Religion: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/107097

The Most Interesting People in Sports: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/107857

The Most Interesting People Who Live Life: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108598

The Most Interesting People Who Live Life, Volume 2: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/108801

Reality is Fabulous: 250 Anecdotes and Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/209963

Resist Psychic Death: 250 Anecdotes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/97267

Seize the Day: 250 Anecdotes and Stories

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/96869

PHILOSOPHY FOR THE MASSES

Philosophy for the Masses: Ethics

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/374071

Philosophy for the Masses: Metaphysics and More

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/374629

Philosophy for the Masses: Religion

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/376026

DISCUSSION GUIDE SERIES

Dante’s Inferno: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/342391

Dante’s Paradise: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/345337

Dante’s Purgatory: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/344723

Forrest Carter’s The Education of Little Tree: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/340944

Homer’s Iliad: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/364356

Homer’s Odyssey: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/360552

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/352848

Jerry Spinelli’s Maniac Magee: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/339978

Jerry Spinelli’s Stargirl: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/340610

Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/352048

Lloyd Alexander’s The Black Cauldron: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/339002

Lloyd Alexander’s The Book of Three: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/339120

Lloyd Alexander’s The Castle of Llyr: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/338589

Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/339720

Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/350434

Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/348104

Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/351719

Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/349030

Nancy Garden’s Annie on My Mind: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/339564

Nicholas Sparks’ A Walk to Remember: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/356224

Virgil, “The Fall of Troy”: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/356868

Virgil’s Aeneid: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/358529

Voltaire’s Candide: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/346971

William Shakespeare’s 1 Henry IV: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/355953

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/354870

William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/355465

William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/354231

William Sleator’s Oddballs: A Discussion Guide

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/353345

***

GOOD DEEDS SERIES (PLURAL)

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 1

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qQ-aJ4kjGQti20c3G2CPm1zile51Yd-5/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 2

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1h1ZaZEixmzjGLHI5_57AwTFuQ02g8lL3/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 3

https://drive.google.com/file/d/12iOTDEzHV6P576LGAijcPQgpt1ogax0R/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 4

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1z0-CAMz-4ulX29CAIHNU16Z912eNqt-v/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 5

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Y7DlPdu-eZwA23gEHPT2YWMT0W5r8eu7/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 6

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1zHZv2iTHQnbVY0n_LihTWXKOvUr4_hyr/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

The Kindest People Who Do Good Deeds: Volume 7

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FSCTtviio4xrX7e07-OuAgYpxmWlIPuk/view?usp=sharing

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com/4

***

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 1

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GfiQMNnQ4G0CHGt1AZQQIPODV596k30j/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 2

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1OHcETsSaWbIhFPIZWeW0laO6mdHVbcph/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 3

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XZCFlAWhtXPnf35OGlUoh991i05D0Bs0/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 4

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Cj8yIDLmFFG6dGzLpoVE3RrQ3-LhKV0d/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 5

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LxqLrwm898Chg3mnRY2NiGZA4FkFdOXR/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 6

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PmAxX5C-viQF0GfIpsM7mTtsyQ9lfm8J/view?usp=sharing

You’ve Got to Be Kind: Volume 7

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Bq_SmSf4rsWdtqA7p0kN9tJ5ip3gqEht/view?usp=sharing

***

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 1)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FqbObI95XKwIr1QWn0lBFDSNsIENTR9B/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 2)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QWF5bRarJBauD7Qdb-_99K9UuQBL_fZ7/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 3)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gUUA4ms-CX7BvVlOaNmpYswPN-eBfKIa/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 4)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1BXLhqmY1qOEaF4u5IMRpSCm7H6jy2mj_/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 5)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pks6XXM4T-r_r4cBBSmUIlP0jARS8i-0/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 6)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ohXsEp79jwf8OdlIXI7I3nPIotjX5wWb/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Be Excellent to Each Other (Volume 7)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_orz__RY0T3A-kpa7fpbS8koDwp0I91p/view?usp=sharing

***

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 1)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13X4KOLTIvPVwSBo1ijX0aJABB8wbgZyT/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 2)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wbRuc4G0EdFeM4UVWk6LwbxDKkF19T2s/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 3)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ksyO9KnAJ6yGpK5CNMY12Ry9HTQ9vxm1/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 4)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NuAM7qAb_XLRGHxUTMLrm2PhOfjU7Fk8/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 5)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1T5HB-AwL4S61aj4lLK3K5Q0ulgQbarR7/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 6)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PYx6MyYI9YY_RKCv3nUZnENwv0jIxfRn/view?usp=sharing

The Kindest People: Heroes and Good Samaritans (Volume 7)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1I8aphNRXnok_slWALv8s8TjJ344sZVml/view?usp=sharing

***

COMPOSITION PROJECTS

Composition Project: Writing an Autobiographical Essay

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1138445

Composition Project: Writing a Hero-of-Human-Rights Essay

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/481598

Composition Project: Writing a Problem-Solving Letter

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1138745

TEACHING

How to Teach the Autobiographical Essay Composition Project in 9 Classes

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/487660

***

IT’S A WONDERFUL WORLD SERIES (Stories and Anecdotes and Opinions)

It’s a Wonderful World: Volumes 1-7

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/690

***

THE RELATIONSHIP BOOKS SERIES

The Relationship Books (Volume 1-8)

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/674

BE KIND AND BE USEFUL SERIES (Stories and Anecdotes and Opinions)

Be Kind and Be Useful: Volumes 1-5)

https://wordpress.com/page/davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/686

***

BRUCE’S MUSIC RECOMMENDATIONS SERIES

Bruce’s Music Recommendations: Volumes 1-8

https://anecdotesandmusic.wordpress.com/2022/04/26/bruces-music-recommendations-free-pdfs/

***

davidbruceblog #1

http://davidbruceblog.wordpress.com/

davidbruceblog #2

https://davidbrucemusic.wordpress.com

davidbruceblog #3

https://cosplayvideos.wordpress.com

davidbruceblog #4

https://davidbruceblog4.wordpress.com

David Bruce Books: Free PDFs

davidbrucebooks: EDUCATE YOURSELF

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com

Anecdotes, Arts, Books, and Music

https://anecdotesandmusic.wordpress.com

George Peele: English Dramatist

https://georgepeeleenglishdramatist.wordpress.com

David Bruce’s Books at Blogspot

https://davidbrucebooks.blogspot.com

David Bruce’s Books at WIX

https://bruceb22.wixsite.com/website/blog

David Bruce’s Books at Smashwords

http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/bruceb

David Bruce’s Books at Apple Books

https://itunes.apple.com/ie/artist/david-bruce/id81470634

David Bruce’s Books at Kobo

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/search?query=david%20bruce&fcsearchfield=Author

David Bruce’s Books at Barnes and Noble

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/%22David%20Bruce%22;jsessionid=D4DEC0519518F94804E91EDDBB9A431F.prodny_store02-atgap06?Ntk=P_key_Contributor_List&Ns=P_Sales_Rank&Ntx=mode+matchall

Teaching Stuff

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How to Teach the Autobiographical Essay Composition Project in 9 Classes

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

William Sleator’s Oddballs: A Discussion Guide

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Problem-Solving Letter

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Hero-of-Human-Rights Essay

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing an Argument Paper with Research

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing an Employee Manual

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing an Evaluation or Review

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Famous-Plagiarist/Fabulist Report

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How Do I Write a Resume, List of References, and Job-Application Letter

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How Do I Write Humor and Satire?

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: The Set of Instructions

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Manual

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Media Opinion Essay

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Interview About On-the-Job Writing

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Composition Project: Writing a Progress Report

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How Do I Write the Introductory Memo Assignment?

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How to Teach the Argument Paper Composition Project in 10 Classes

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How to Teach the Famous-Plagiarist Research Report Composition Project in 8 Classes

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How to Teach the Manual Composition Project in 8 Classes

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

How to Teach the Resume, Job-Application Letter, and List of References Composition  Project in 6 Classes

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Free Writing Handouts with Anecdotes: Volume 1

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Free Writing Handouts with Anecdotes: Volume 2

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

Free Writing Handouts with Anecdotes:  Volume 3

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/teaching-guides/

DANTE INFERNO HAIKU PDF

https://cosplayvideos.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/dante-inferno-haiku.pdf 

DANTE PURGATORY HAIKU PDF

https://cosplayvideos.files.wordpress.com/2019/03/dante-purgatory-haiku-pdf.pdf

DANTE PARADISE HAIKU PDF

https://cosplayvideos.files.wordpress.com/2018/09/dante-paradise-haiku.pdf

davidbrucehaiku #1 through #10 (Free PDFs)

https://davidbruceblog.wordpress.com/patreon/

davidbrucehaiku #11

https://davidbrucemusic.files.wordpress.com/2018/10/davidbrucehaiku-11.pdf

davidbrucehaiku #12

https://cosplayvideos.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/davidbrucehaiku-12.pdf

davidbrucehaiku #13

https://cosplayvideos.wordpress.com/2019/04/08/davidbrucehaiku-13/

https://cosplayvideos.files.wordpress.com/2019/04/davidbrucehaiku13.pdf

davidbrucehaiku #14

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/davidbrucehaiku/

davidbrucehaiku #15

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/davidbrucehaiku/

davidbrucehaiku #16

https://davidbruceblog429065578.wordpress.com/davidbrucehaiku/

 

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